Clinical Courses

The law school offers seven clinical courses that provide students with opportunities to counsel and represent actual clients under the direct supervision of law school faculty.

Appellate Clinic (2 cr.) D/N 808 Students represent indigent clients in civil or criminal appeals. Conducted under the supervision of clinical faculty, students are responsible for all aspects of representation, including client communication, drafting motions and briefs to the Indiana Court of Appeals, presenting oral argument and litigating a petition to transfer to the Indiana Supreme Court. P: Completion of 45 credit hours, Criminal Law (D/N 533), Intramural Moot Court (D/N 746), and completion of or enrollment in Professional Responsibility (D/N 861). The following courses are strongly recommended: Evidence (D/N 632), Criminal Procedure: Investigation (D/N 702), and Appellate Practice (D/N 810). Students must submit an application and receive instructor approval prior to registration.

Civil Practice Clinic (3 or 4 cr.) D/N 808 Students represent clients in a variety of civil matters. These include domestic cases, such as dissolution of marriage, custody, support, paternity, and domestic violence; housing controversies; consumer problems; challenges to administrative decisions of state and federal agencies; and a variety of other general civil problems. This clinic is conducted under the supervision of clinical faculty, but students are responsible for all aspects of representation, including presentations in court and administrative hearings. P: Completion of 45 credit hours and completion of or enrollment in Professional Responsibility (DN861).

Conservation Law Clinic (3 cr.) D/N ___ This clinic allows students to work in the Conservation Law Center, a public interest law firm based in Indiana that represents clients who need legal assistance with natural resource conservation matters. Students work closely with clinic attorneys, and participate directly in the representation of Conservation Law Center clients in the setting of a public interest law firm. Clinic matters have included extensive work on the law of conservation easements; analysis of conservation related laws; development of and comment on new administrative rules, legislation and strategies; and litigation at trial and appellate levels. Prerequisites: Environmental Law [LAW 891] and Natural Resources Law [LAW 717] plus permission of ENR Program Director. (Application: DOC | PDF)

Criminal Defense Clinic (3 or 4 cr.) D/N 808 Students represent clients in criminal cases involving a variety of misdemeanor or Class D felony charges. Conducted under supervision of clinical faculty, students are responsible for all aspects of representation, including presentations in court. P: Completion of 45 credit hours, Criminal Law (DN533), Evidence (DN632), Criminal Procedure: Investigation (DN702) and completion of or enrollment in Professional Responsibility (DN861).

Disability Clinic (2 cr.) D/N 808 Under faculty supervision, students interview, counsel, and represent persons with disabilities in administrative appeals. Typical legal problems presented include eligibility for and continuation of benefits based on disability from the Social Security Administration. P: Completion of all basic-level required courses except Constitutional Law.

Health and Human Rights Clinic (3 cr.) D/N 808 In this clinic, students in the Health and Human Rights Clinic engage in domestic human rights advocacy and litigation addressing the social determinants of health. Students directly represent, under faculty supervision, low-income clients from the community, especially workers who have been wrongfully denied their earned wages or are appealing a challenge to their access to unemployment benefits. On issues including workers' rights, students engage in advocacy in the form of appellate briefs, investigations and reports, and public education. These cases and these projects, and companion international projects pursued in partnership with global justice advocates, also provide a platform for the review of issues in international human rights law and comparative law. Students must submit an application to be considered for this clinic.

Immigration Clinic (2 or 3 cr.) D/N 808 Students represent both detained and non-detained clients in immigration matters before federal administrative agencies under the supervision of the professor/counsel. Typical cases involve claims of asylum, family-based immigration petitions (including domestic violence) and crime victim visas. Students may enroll in the clinic for two consecutive semesters. P: Course is open to upper level J.D. students and LL.M. students. Completion of or enrollment in Immigration Law (unless waived by the instructor) and Professional Responsibility is required. Students must receive instructor approval prior to registration. (Application: DOC | PDF)

Wrongful Conviction Clinic (2 or 3 cr.) D/N 808 Students represent indigent clients seeking relief from wrongful convictions in state post-conviction and/or federal habeas corpus proceedings. State cases are accepted in cooperation with the Office of the State Public Defender. In the classroom component of the course, students consider federal and state post-conviction remedies and the relevant issues, including eyewitness identifications, false confessions, informants, government misconduct, junk science, and DNA testing. Registration is for 2-3 credit hours, pass/fail, with sixty hours of clinical activity required for each credit hour. Students completing the Criminal Defense Clinic are eligible to register. Without the prerequisite of the Criminal Defense Clinic, registration is in the discretion of the faculty.(Application: DOC | PDF)

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